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About Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax is the principal city of Nova Scotia and one of the most dramatically indented coastlines in the world. It is also one of the closest Canadian ports to Europe, hence its early prominence in transatlantic trade (Samuel Cunard was born here). For lovers of maritime history, a call at the cruise port Halifax will be one of the most memorable of a cruise around the USA's Eastern Seaboard and the Canadian Maritimes.

When the Titanic hit an iceberg and sank in April 1912, the rescue and recovery operation was co-ordinated from Halifax, which became the last resting place for many of its victims.  The city's fascinating Maritime Museum - set right on its waterfront - holds remnants of the ship, including a steamer chair.

Equally interesting are the two- to three-hour 'Historic Halifax Downtown Walks', which leave from the International Visitor Centre on Sackville Street and show visitors the city's highlights, including the 19th century mansion of George Wright, one of the 33 millionaires who joined Titanic's maiden voyage.

 

Shore excursions in Halifax, Nova Scotia

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